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Author: tm-mg-admin

Bans of HHP will not prevent all suicidal deaths if patients are treated by doctors as if they have ingested potentially lethal pesticides, since treatment for these patients can be hazardous in its own right. We will therefore work with the World Health Organisation to develop international and then national guidelines for the management of...

Component parts of the United Nations working on highly hazardous pesticides (FAO, WHO, UNEP) provide technical advice to countries and offer the most effective route to international change and impact, particularly through governing bodies: the World Health Assembly and FAO Conference. CPSP works with the WHO and FAO looking at suicide prevention (WHO) and pesticide regulation...

Removing highly hazardous pesticides from agriculture requires cultural change, including movement to integrated pest management and agroecology methods which preserve natural predators while minimising pesticide use. We support these efforts in a modest way, always trying to identify pivotal points where modest investment of time, people or funds offers the potential for significant impact. ...

A key aim of CPSP’s work on pesticide regulation is to increase capacity for effective pesticide regulation at national level. CPSP aims to increase its work outside of Nepal and India by engaging with regional pesticide regulation bodies, for example the Coordinating Group of Pesticide Control Boards of the Caribbean (CGPC), the Southern African Pesticide...